Stop Dealership Crimes By Recognizing Red Flags

Fraud-prevention experts cite the following red flags that might indicate hanky-panky is going on under your nose: Secretive behavior at work at unusual hours; excessively long hours Presence in odd places loitering in departments unrelated to their job description Using others' desks could indicate their use of others' PCs to commit crimes Behavior actions not congruent with their job description

Fraud-prevention experts cite the following red flags that might indicate hanky-panky is going on under your nose:

  • Secretive behavior — at work at unusual hours; excessively long hours
  • Presence in odd places — loitering in departments unrelated to their job description
  • Using others' desks — could indicate their use of others' PCs to commit crimes
  • Behavior — actions not congruent with their job description
  • Refusal to take time off
  • Refusal to allow others into their work space
  • Refusal to share data with others
  • Desire to work alone, without assistance
  • Refusal to accept help, even when overloaded with work
  • Refusal to allow audits
  • Excessive conversation about gambling
  • Unstable personal relationships

Psychologist Kathleen Shea notes another noteworthy indicator:

“When you walk into someone's cubical or office and they snap off their computer and stand to greet you eye to eye you might think there are being polite, but that is unusual behavior.

“An individual at work at a legitimate task is going to be concentrating on the phase of their work and wants to finish that before stopping to start a conversation with a visitor.”

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