Survey Says Lax Americans Aid Car and Identity Thieves

A survey says bad security habits make Americans vulnerable to vehicle-related thefts. Nearly half of Americans leave mail in their vehicle; one quarter has left a wallet or purse; and nearly one third has left bank statements all of which contain personal information that can put people at risk for identity theft. While people exercise good common sense theft protection measures in some areas, such

A survey says bad security habits make Americans vulnerable to vehicle-related thefts.

Nearly half of Americans leave mail in their vehicle; one quarter has left a wallet or purse; and nearly one third has left bank statements — all of which contain personal information that can put people at risk for identity theft.

While people exercise good common sense theft protection measures in some areas, such as always locking their vehicle (79%) and not leaving spare keys in the vehicle (93%), many leave themselves open to thieves, according to the survey by LoJack Corp. and the National Insurance Crime Bureau.

Most glaring, a full 33% admit that they have left their car running, making it a thief magnet. Also, 47% don't always park in a well-lit area and nearly 40% don't hide valuables.

“A vehicle is stolen on average every 25.5 seconds in the U.S.,” says NICB CEO Robert M. Bryant.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish