Lots of Mustang Sallys

While only 4% of female motorists consider themselves severe drivers, 41% actually are, according to findings in the new study by the Automotive Aftermarket Industry Assn. (AAIA) Vehicle Maintenance & The Female Motorist, an analysis of the attitudes and perceptions that influence women's behavior regarding vehicle maintenance and repair, asked female drivers to self-classify whether they were or

While only 4% of female motorists consider themselves severe drivers, 41% actually are, according to findings in the new study by the Automotive Aftermarket Industry Assn. (AAIA)

“Vehicle Maintenance & The Female Motorist,” an analysis of the attitudes and perceptions that influence women's behavior regarding vehicle maintenance and repair, asked female drivers to self-classify whether they were “normal” or “severe” drivers.

Ninety-six percent classified themselves as normal, but only 59% turned out to be normal based on certain objective driving pattern criteria.

“As recommended maintenance behavior differs for normal vs. severe drivers, this inability to properly classify suggests a need to better educate women about what makes a severe driver,” says AAIA President and CEO Kathleen Schmatz.

Data featured in the study include perceived importance of regular maintenance and awareness of need for maintenance and repairs.

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