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Hyundai outspends competing advertisers to claim most-seen auto TV ad.

Hyundai Spot Leads Ranking of Most-Seen Auto TV Ads

Kia is the most-seen brand in the latest ranking, with two commercials that had a combined 230.6 million national TV ad impressions, per iSpot.

“Stretch,” a new commercial for the ’24 Hyundai Tucson, takes first place on iSpot.tv’s ranking of the most-seen auto TV ads for Oct. 23-29 with 224.7 million national TV ad impressions. 

The spot humorously visualizes how the automaker’s Bluelink+ app allows drivers to extend their reach to remotely lock doors, turn on the heat or even locate the vehicle. Over 66% of its impressions came from football: NFL games generated 100.3 million impressions and college football racked up 49.6 million. Additionally, NBA games delivered 25.9 million impressions. According to iSpot’s Creative Assessment, this spot had an overall Persuasion score nearly 8.5% above industry norms.  

With 210.2 million national TV ad impressions, a spot from Honda detailing the company’s aspirations for the future slips from first to second place week-over-week. Football remains a key driver of impressions for the spot, with NFL games generating 26.2 million impressions and college football delivering 28.5 million. Top impressions-driving networks include CBS (28.6 million), Fox (26.8 million) and Bravo (16.2 million). 

The third-place commercial declares that while a truck may be a tool, “a Ram is life,” with “innovations, comforts and powertrains built to power all the lives you live.” It had 128.4 million national TV ad impressions, with top networks by impressions including CBS (54.1 million), Fox (19.5 million) and ABC (17.8 million). Per iSpot’s Creative Assessment, this commercial had an 88% brand match (the percentage of survey respondents who remembered it was a Ram Trucks ad after watching it), above the recent automaker industry norm of 77%.

Kia owns the fourth- and fifth-place spots, which received a combined 230.6 million national TV ad impressions. Although they promote different vehicles (the ’23 Sportage Hybrid and the ’24 Telluride X-Pro, respectively), there are a few similarities between them. Both showcase the models’ ability to take on rugged, unpredictable terrain with humorous, fantastical scenarios. College football was one of the key drivers of impressions, delivering around 5 million impressions for each, while Hallmark, with its early offering of Christmas fare, was the top impressions-driving network for both spots. 

(Click on blue links for videos) 

1. Hyundai: Stretch 

Impressions: 224,737,018

Interruption Rate: 2.00%

Attention Index: 115

Est. TV Spend: $5,125,555

2. Honda: Keep Dreaming 

Impressions: 210,223,236 

Interruption Rate: 3.42%

Attention Index: 96

Est. TV Spend: $3,458,106 

3. Ram Trucks: Life 

Impressions: 128,420,373

Interruption Rate: 2.02%

Attention Index: 94

Est. TV Spend: $4,439,554 

4. Kia: Bird's Eye View 

Impressions: 123,065,849 

Interruption Rate: 2.93%

Attention Index: 104

Est. TV Spend: $974,424

5. Kia: Larger Than Life Adventures 

Impressions: 107,553,145 

Interruption Rate: 3.33%

Attention Index: 100

Est. TV Spend: $807,608 

 

Data provided by iSpot.tv, The New Standard for TV Ad Measurement

 

TV Impressions - Total TV ad impressions delivered for the brand or spot.

 

Interruption Rate - The percentage of devices that were present at the beginning of the ad but did not complete watching the ad. Actions that interrupt ad play include changing the channel, pulling up the guide, fast-forwarding or turning off the TV. The Interruption rate is measured on a scale of 0 to 100%.

 

Attention Index - A comparison of the ad’s Interruption Rate against its specific media placement. The Attention Index is measured on a scale of 0 to 200, where 100 is the average and means the ad is performing as expected.


Est. National TV Spend - Amount spent on TV airings for the brand’s spots.

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