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Seats designed to counter sedentary lifestyles.

JLR Looks to Ease Pain of Driving

JLR claims its “morphable” seats use a series of actuators in the seat foam to create constant micro-adjustments that fool the brain into thinking the body is out for a stroll.

Jaguar Land Rover could bring you car seats that will make your body think you’re walking instead of driving.

“Morphable” seats, being tested by JLR’s body interiors research division, use a series of actuators in the seat foam to create constant micro-adjustments that claim to fool the brain into thinking the body is out for a stroll.

These exercise seats could be individually tailored to each driver and passenger and are designed to combat the sedentary lifestyle that afflicts so many modern workers in this digital age.

Lack of sufficient physical movement is known to shorten muscles in the legs, hips and gluteal areas, causing back pain and increasing the risk of injuries from falls or strains.

By simulating the rhythm of walking, a movement known as pelvic oscillation, the technology can help reduce the health risks of sitting down for long periods of time on extended journeys.

Dr. Steve Iley, JLR chief medical officer, says: “The well-being of our customers and employees is at the heart of all our technological research projects. We are using our engineering expertise to develop the seat of the future using innovative technologies not seen before in the automotive industry to help tackle an issue that affects people across the globe.”

Iley also offers advice on how to adjust seats to ensure the perfect driving position, including removing bulky items in pockets, correct shoulder positioning, ensuring spine and pelvis are straight and supporting thighs and reduce pressure points.

TAGS: Technology
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