Speak Their Language

Here is a little-known secret to increase a dealer's ability to communicate effectively and to boost sales people's vehicle sales. Learn enough about a prospect so that you know if you should appeal primarily to their eyes, ears or feelings.

Here is a little-known secret to increase a dealer's ability to communicate effectively and to boost sales people's vehicle sales.

Learn enough about a prospect so that you know if you should appeal primarily to their eyes, ears or feelings.

Know if your prospects relate to the world with pictures in their heads (visual) or words they hear and say to themselves or out loud (auditory) or by a combination of both, causing an emotional or gut response (feeling or kinesthetic).

This helps you talk your prospect's language. This is how people prefer to learn. And buy! When you alter your communication abilities to adapt to that, you'll manage your staff and prospects better and close more deals.

Here's a test. Talk to a number of people you know. Ask them a question that forces them to ponder their answers for a second or two before speaking.

Your job is to note where their eyes go before they respond. Here's a breakdown:

  • 35% of the population relates to their world visually through images in their mind. They will divert their gaze upper left as they think and recall the information in their mind.
  • 25% of the population processes their world through words and hearing. They keep their eyes level when pondering something, while diverting them to the left or right.
  • 40% use both visual and auditory cues —; and rely on their gut feeling. Their eyes will go down as they search their mind for the answer to a question.

Note: Everyone uses all three at one time or another. It's just that most people have a tendency to use ne that is the most comfortable for them — especially when purchasing a high-ticket item like a vehicle.

It's at that moment during the sales cycle that sales people and managers need to be sensitive to the one the customer uses most.

When we do that, we can better match our communication style to theirs. Result: build stronger trust faster and sell more vehicles.

We put them at ease faster, build trust more rapidly, and in general have clearer communications with them. We understand them better and vice versa. Switch your communication style to match how the client learns and buys and — bang — you're in their head.

  • Visual people will make “see” statements: “I see what you're saying.” “I'd like to see a brochure.” “I saw your ad.” “Can you show that to me?”
  • Auditory learners will make “hear” statements: “I hear what you're saying.” “I'd like to hear more about.” “Let me ask you a question and you can tell me what to do.” “Other customers tell me it's the best service, they call and ask for me.”
  • Kinesthetic or emotional learners make “touch” statements: “I feel that way too.” “Can you give me a brochure?” “I'd like to get a better handle on my finances.” “I'll visit the dealership to take a test drive.”

I helps to match your communications style with the one the prospect uses most.

For example, if a prospect says, “I'd like to talk (auditory) about the used pickup truck,” don't say, “Great, let me show (visual) it to you.”

Instead, the better response to this type of auditory prospect would be: “Great, let's sit down and talk (auditory) about it for a few minutes. I'd be glad to explain (auditory) things to you. People have been saying (auditory) the greatest things about that vehicle. Wait until you hear (auditory) what they're saying (auditory).”

Finally, if you are unsure what a customer prefers, do all three. “I'll show (visual) you the numbers, and explain (auditory) things in detail so you'll feel (kinesthetic) comfortable.”

Paul H. Webb, a licensed NLP Master Trainer is the founder of Street Smart/I.T.S., Inc. He can be reached at 888-469-7117 and [email protected].

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