Toyota FineComfort Ride has adjustable loungestyle seating

Toyota Fine-Comfort Ride has adjustable, lounge-style seating.

Toyota Debuts Fuel-Cell Lounge Concept for Tokyo

Major exterior design cues include a diamond-shaped cabin (narrowing toward the rear of the vehicle, wider from the front to the center) and wheels pushed to the car’s four corners.

Days after revealing one electric car bound for its Tokyo auto show stand, Toyota today details another.

But the Fine-Comfort Ride concept, just shy of the length of a Toyota Camry sedan, is envisioned as a 621-mile-range (1,000-km) fuel-cell vehicle, using electricity generated by hydrogen and oxygen in a fuel-cell stack, and stored in a battery, as its fuel source. Toyota estimates the car’s hydrogen refueling time at roughly three minutes.

“The Fine-Comfort Ride proposes a new form of the premium saloon by employing a flexible layout unique to electric-powered vehicles and a large amount of available electric power using hydrogen as an energy source,” the automaker says in a statement.

Major exterior design cues include a diamond-shaped cabin (narrowing toward the rear of the vehicle, wider from the front to the center) and wheels pushed to the car’s four corners. In-wheel motors deliver propulsion, and there is an underbody cover to improve aerodynamics and cabin quietness, Toyota says.

Inside, the Fine-Comfort Ride has seating for six and seats can be adjusted for posture, as well as organized in a layout for “individual (or) communication space.” Seats are controlled via an “Agent” touch display accessible to the driver and passengers.

Toyota will display the Fine-Comfort Ride concept, as well as its Concept-i series of models – with artificial intelligence that can read human emotions and moods and change vehicle preferences based on those readings, as well as converse with drivers – at its Tokyo show stand later this month.

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